Study Finds Female Gun Owners Are More Political

Guns “empower” women, and this empowerment also makes female gun owners more politically active, according to a new study. “Intersectionality in Action: Gun Ownership and Women’s Political Participation,” was published July 2019 in Social Science Quarterly. Its lead author is Alexandra Middlewood, who holds a doctorate in political science and is an assistant professor of political science at Wichita State University. “Gun-owning women exhibit levels of political participation about gun policy and a greater willingness to engage in political discussions about gun control than non-owning women,” the study noted. It also found greater participation on political matters not related to gun policy.

The study observed that women gun owners are more likely than other women to participate in the following ways:

  • Following politics,
  • Contacting officials,
  • Contributing money,
  • Expressing opinions about gun issues on social media,
  • Signing gun-policy petitions,
  • Registering to vote, and
  • Voting in elections.

That’s great news for the Second Amendment, but why are gun-owning women more politically active? Middlewood told America’s 1st Freedom that it’s important to understand the reasons behind the behavioral changes. These reasons, as outlined in the study, are as follows:

  • Gun owners can be politically mobilized more easily than non-owners. “Due to their associations with gun-related organizations and social networks, women gun owners are relatively accessible to political organizations intent on engaging citizens—especially pro-gun organizations.”
  • Particularly since many women purchase firearms for personal safety, political issues become personal to them. “The possibility of future, more restrictive regulations on gun owners may be sufficient motivation for political engagement.”
  • Gun possession can be empowering, which can translate to more action even outside of gun issues: “surveys suggest … gun ownership helps women overcome feelings of vulnerability and victimization. … Conceivably the transformation that firearms produce should strengthen women’s motivations to engage in various forms of politics, especially gun-related issues.

The study also found that gun-owning women seem more willing to discuss the matter with those who disagree. Female gun owners were willing to discuss gun ownership even if they didn’t think the majority would support their opinion. Non-gun-owning women were considerably less likely to discuss it if they thought the majority opinion was different from their own. Essentially, since women who don’t own guns can be “more sensitive to perceptions of public support,” women gun owners’ willingness to discuss and publicly support Second Amendment issues may be a very powerful way to influence American culture overall.

Article by “America’s First Freedom”, Dec 5, 2019

Sheriff’s Tips: The Good Samaritan

When I have the time, and weather permits, I like to go for a walk and get a little exercise. In my little town, it is the rare day that two or three people don’t stop and ask if I need a ride. Quite a bit of America is still that way—taking the time to help others. However, a person needs to keep in mind that there is a darker element in our society and the helpful citizen can quickly become just another victim.

Recently, in a force-on-force scenario, a student, who happened to be an EMT, saw a young woman lying crumpled by the side of a path. He rushed to her side to render aid only to see her roll over and run a rubber knife across his throat. In the debriefing, he told the instructor that he was an EMT and just had to render aid. The instructor told him that he used to be an EMT—now he was just a dead man.

I am not about to tell you that you shouldn’t help others who are in need. But, I will caution you that you should be in Condition Orange when you approach these situations. One should be on high alert and ready to take defensive action if things turn out bad.

Suppose you see a woman standing by her disabled car on a dark and lonely stretch of road. Can you just ignore her and drive on by?  Frankly, I have a hard time doing that. But you need to realize that this could be a set up—with her accomplices hiding nearby, ready to steal your car, rob you, or worse. One excellent idea is to come to a stop while you are still some distance from the woman and her car, looking the scene over carefully before going any closer.

And then there is the not-uncommon situation of a guy beating on a woman out in the shopping center parking lot. None of us like to see something like that. It could be a robbery, an abduction, or a domestic fuss, and you really don’t have any way of knowing until you get right in the middle of it. Any police officer who has any experience at all can tell tales about breaking up a domestic attack to protect the woman, only to have the woman turn on the officer.

A similar situation might be seeing two guys fighting and one of them is clearly getting the worst of it. Before you jump in, you might consider if this could be an undercover officer trying to arrest a drug dealer. And how do you tell the difference just by looking at them?  In this and other scenarios, you might set out to be helpful only to find yourself the actual victim or even one of those charged with criminal offenses. Or you could just find yourself dead because you failed to read the situation accurately.

I am glad that my fellow Americans still take the time and effort to help others. But we need to be on high alert when we consider going into such situations. Go with your gut feeling—if it looks bad and feels bad, it could very well be bad. In those cases, it is a really good idea to just go on by and call 9-1-1. From a safe distance, being a good witness might be the best help that you can render.

Be careful out there.

American rifleman, December 7, 2019

Buying a Suppressor

Silencers for firearms were made in 1902 by Hiram Percy Maxim in lock-step with another one of his inventions, the car muffler. This makes sense because both products utilized nearly identical technology. Today car mufflers are mandated by the government, while firearm suppressors are highly regulated by it. That doesn’t make any sense at all.

Fact is, silencers, also called suppressors, are rarely used in crime but offer myriad advantages. While they are not silent-supersonic projectiles still make a whip-like crack as they break the sound barrier-suppressors mitigate noise at the muzzle of the gun so it’s not as dangerous to nearby ears. They also reduce recoil. They promote accuracy via less recoil and less flinch-inducing noise. Finally, they reduce noise complaints from non-shooter. Firearm suppressors are legal to own in 39 states and legal for hunting in 34. But they remain rather expensive and difficult to purchase due to the BATF’s restrictions. Nonetheless, if you can purchase a handgun you can likely own a silencer, and you probably should. Your ears, your neighbors and your shooting will benefit. Here’s how:

  1.  If silencers are legal to own in your state (this includes AL, AK, AZ, AR, CO, CT, FL, GA, ID, IN, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MI, MS, MO, MT, NE, NV, NH, NM, NC, ND, OH, OK, OR, PA, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VA, WA, WV, WI, and WY) pick one that fits your shotgun, handgun or rifle at your Class III arms (machine guns, etc.)  dealer. Its serial number will be used for the registration process, but you won’t be able to purchase it or take it home until it is registered to you by the BATF’s NFA branch. Alternatively, there is an online store called silencershop.com where you can buy a silencer online. You’ll still have to go through the following steps, but the Silencer Shop has streamlined the process by doing most of it for you, then shipping your silencer to your local dealer.
  2.  Before you can purchase a silencer you must be approved and your silencer registered by the BATF. There are three ways to register the suppressor for purchase. A: Register it to yourself; B: Form a trust and register the suppressor to that trust; or C: Register as a corporation. Many legal experts advocate option B for personal suppressor purchase.

Forming a trust requires a legal document to be filed with the state. It can cost anywhere from $100-$500 in legal fees, but it makes buying a suppressor easier because trust holders can forgo the fingerprint, photograph and authority’s signature portions of the registration process. While individuals cannot let anyone use their silencer if they are not within the owner’s eyesight, trust holders can allow those listed on the trust as trustees to use the silencer. Both the The Silencer Shop and the silencer manufacturer Silencerco sell ready-made trust paperwork on their websites. Or you can contact a local attorney who’s familiar with your state’s trust laws.

  1.  Fill out the BATF’s required forms, form 4 and form 5330.20, in duplicate; (The BATF previously had an e-file system available but at the moment it’s not up, so you must fill out the paper forms and also have your dealer fill out its portion before sending.) If you’re registering as an individual, you’ll need to get fingerprinted and photographed. Ask your dealer about the forms and proper fingerprint cards.
  2.  Pay the $200 transfer fee (commonly called a tax stamp) to the BATF. In addition to this cost, your dealer will often charge a transfer fee for completing the paperwork, mailing it and receiving and transferring the suppressor. The Silencer Shop charges $70 if you do not live in Texas, but they’ll ship it to you at no additional cost.
  3.  When the BATF receives your paperwork and fee and approves your form 4, your dealer is then authorized to transfer the silencer to you, via a standard form 4473 used in firearm purchases. The tax stamp stays with the silencer for as long as you own it; it can be used on various guns. If you go to buy another silencer, the entire process (except setting up a trust) must be completed again and another $200 paid for each silencer purchased.

In the end, you’ll have a firearm that’s fun to shoot, safe for your ears and easy on the neighbors.

NRA Family, December 7, 2019